Here's How To Find Out More About The Winnie The Pooh Character

Winnie The Pooh Character

When A.A.Milne had his first Pooh Bear story published in 1926, he could not have known how his Winnie the Pooh character would become loved by children and their parents all over the world. The stories and poems have been translated into several languages including Latin, and the original illustrations by E.H. Shepard are valued collector's items.

The bear was named after the stuffed bear owned by Milne's son, Christopher Robin. Milne started writing the stories as entertainment for his young son. Of course, the character of the boy named after his son also features in the stories along with other friends such as Piglet, Tigger, and Eeyore. They all live happily and have adventures in the Hundred Acre Wood, a location based on the real life forest where the Milne family lived in England. The Winnie the Pooh character is a lovable, friendly bear who has a simple outlook on life. He only needs honey, friends and a game of poohsticks to be happy. Poohsticks is actually played on the rivers of England and there is an annual competition for it. It involves dropping sticks into the river from a bridge, as in the stories, and the first stick to finish over the line is declared the winner.

Purists prefer the original books with the E.H. Shepard drawings to the Disney version of the Winnie the Pooh character. However, the vast majority of people know the Pooh stories through the Disney movies. They are immensely popular and have been one of Disney's most successful franchises. State of the art, computer aided animated films are all the rage now but everyone still loves Pooh. There are TV shows and video games in addition to the films and a range of merchandise. You can get stuffed toys, lunch boxes, pencil sets and so on.

Pooh is one of the most enduring stars of children's literature. The Winnie the Pooh character will not date and will continue to be a favorite. His appeal was recognized when he was given a prestigious star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2006. Perhaps it is still so popular because it represents an idyll, a more innocent time when it was safe to go into the woods and play with your friends. In recent times, some authors have taken the Winnie the Pooh character rather seriously and written books to explain philosophy, using Pooh as an example. Perhaps there is something in the Zen of poohsticks to teach us all.

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